The Feng Shui Lucky Cat or Money Cat

The Feng Shui Lucky Cat is one of the most common Feng Shui cures you see out there. It is also known as the welcoming cat, lucky cat, money cat, fortune cat, or happy cat.

It is also sometimes called the Chinese happy cat because it is popular with Chinese businesses. This name is a mistake because the Lucky Cat actually comes from Japanese culture. The name in Japanese is Maneki-Neko, which means beckoning cat.

The Feng Shui Lucky Cat Is Not Actually Waving

The Feng Shui Lucky Cat looks like it is waving, but it is actually beckoning, or inviting people, money and good luck in.

The left paw is believed to invite customers. The right paw is believed to bring in money and good luck. This is the reason that some versions of the lucky cat have both paws up.

Not everyone agrees on what the left or right paw means when it is raised. Everyone agrees that the lucky cat is a good symbol to have in a business, especially in a business that does retail.

The Feng Shui Lucky Cat is usually white with calico spots, red on the inside of the ears and some gold. You can also find figurines that are gold where the white would be.

The Lucky cat wears a collar and bell that are reminiscent of those worn by cats in very wealthy households. It holds a coin on one paw, or has one hanging from his neck.

A Good Money Cure, but not a Cure for Wealth

Most Feng Shui consultants use money and wealth cures interchangeably. In the Nine Steps to Feng Shui we make a very clear distinction.

Money works with the water element, and as such it belong with the Career, Life Mission and Individuality Life Area.

Wealth works with the wood (tree or forest) element. As such belongs with the Wealth, Prosperity and Self-Worth Life Area.

Money is about flow in abundance.

Wealth is about accumulation and growth.

The Lucky Cat is about attracting abundance to the main entrance, so it is by definition a cure for money, but not a cure for wealth.

Where to Place the Feng Shui Lucky Cat

The best place for the Lucky Cat is near the cash register in a business, because that is the place that receives the  money. If you want to use it in a home, place it in your foyer, on your entry table.

If you run an online business from home you can place a lucky cat facing you, near the computer, right side preferred. You can also get the Feng Shui Lucky Cat below as a screen saver or wall paper on your computer. The image below contains the Vibrational Healing abstract paintings by healer Bill Austin.

The Feng Shui Lucky Cat – Digital Image

When to Use the Feng Shui Lucky Cat

Use the Feng Shui Lucky Cat only if you love to see it. It is very important that you love everything you see when you first come into your business or into your home.

If you don’t particularly care for the look of the Feng Shui Lucky Cat, then it is better that you use other cures to attract customers/money to your business or to create an environment to increase income in your home.

When Not to Use the Feng Shui Lucky Cat

The only drawback that I can see to using a Lucky Cat is that for many people it is a reminder of a Chinese restaurant, so it might look odd or create confusion when used with a different type of business.

For example, if you own a jewelry store, it might look weird to have a lucky cat next to your cash register. However, you can place a mirror inside of the cash register drawer, to symbolically double the amount to money. That would be a very discreet money cure that wouldn’t affect the style of your decor. Another discreet cure you could add is to place a Feng Shui Money Bag in the drawer.

The Feng Shui Lucky Cat – Digital Image

 

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4 Comments:

  1. My gold Feng Shui Money Cat sits on my little table by the front door. I also have a photo a friend took of the waves from the Pacific Ocean coming in above the table, and a small golden boat next to my Lucky Cat.

  2. I love you article, as always. There is never anything that you write that I do not like or love! I love my two “Feng Shui Cats” as well, although after reading your article, I am not really sure they should be called Feng Shui since they are of Japanese origin. They sit in my entry way at the top of the stairs and they cause me to smile when I see them. Of course, I have a cat and I love “everything cats”. LOL!

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