Have I told you about my nanny Germania?

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When I was a child, in Ecuador, I had a nanny called Germania. Germania was a Native South American. She worked for our family for many years. (The woman in the picture above is not Germania, but she reminds me of her.)

In addition to being my nanny, Germania cleaned our house and helped my mother in the preparation of meals, working from 7 AM to 7 PM.

Germania made it possible for my mother to live a lavish lifestyle.

My mother would tell me that she hoped when I grew up I was a professional, so I could have not just one Germania, but 2 or 3, so I would never, ever, have to do any housework myself.

When I was 8 years old Germania had a baby of her own, but she was not allowed to bring the baby to work.

Germania’s mother, a washing woman, carried Germania’s baby on her back, wrapped in a poncho, as she traveled from home to home, in Quito.

While she washed other people’s clothes by hand, on washing stones in outdoor patios, she set the baby down on the poncho, on cold concrete floors.

Sometimes the baby cried and cried. I knew this, because Germania’s mother was also our washing lady, and came to our place once a week.

Even at that early age, I couldn’t help thinking that there was something awfully wrong with a system that required one woman to give up her child for over 12 hours a day, so that women like my mother could have an easy life.

My mother hoped that I would have 3 maids to help me out — that was her idea of comfort. I did not want to have 3 women give up their lives so that I could live mine.

Many of the decisions I have made as an adult, and in my business, are based on Germania’s story.

In case you are wondering, as an adult, I have never had a maid. I cook from scratch every day, and I have always been the main caretaker of my children.

When I do housework, my memories are filled with images of how Germania did things.

Much of my early adult life was spent figuring out how I could manage to work from home and have the time to raise my own children.

Part of my mission, in this lifetime, is to help other women care for their homes, and connect to their true passions.

Becoming a Feng Shui Consultant is one way in which mothers with young children can bless other people with their knowledge and advice, and contribute to the family income, by just working a few hours per week.

Please share with me: what is your ideal scenario for working and raising children?

What sacrifices have you had to make in order to raise your children, while staying true to your values?

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One Comment:

  1. I have had to fly for work frequently which takes me away from my family. I try to connect with them by sharing pics, phone, texting, etc.

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